Take A Deep Breath





How are you feeling with the upcoming holiday weekend? For many, this time of the year isn’t filled with joy. It can be a time when grief, loneliness and anger comes up. Lately I’ve been helping my clients process these emotions and get them out of a state of depression. On top of holiday triggers, we are still in a pandemic and we beyond exhausted from the last two years.


Here are some suggestions from @namicommunicate on how you can reduce stress and maintain good mental health during the holiday season:


⭐️ Accept your needs. Be kind to yourself! Put your own mental and physical well-being first. Recognize what your triggers are to help you prepare for stressful situations. Once you know this, you can take steps to avoid or cope with stress.


⭐️ Manage your time and don’t try to do too much. Prioritizing your time and activities can help you use your time well. It’s okay to say no to plans that don’t fit into your schedule or make you feel good.


⭐️ Set boundaries. Family dynamics can be complex. Acknowledge them and accept that you can only control your role. If you need to, find ways to limit your exposure.


⭐️ Breathe More. Deep breathing, meditation and progressive muscle relaxation are good ways to calm yourself. Taking a break to refocus can have benefits beyond the immediate moment. You can find meditations to help you return to a state of calm at www.feelcalmtoday.com


⭐️ Exercise. Schedule time to walk outside, be in nature, bike or join a dance class. Exercise naturally produces stress-relieving hormones in your body and improves your overall physical health.


⭐️ Write a gratitude list. As we near the end of the year, it’s a good time to reflect back on what you are grateful for, then thank those who have supported you. Gratitude helps to improve mental health.


⭐️ Set aside time for yourself and prioritize self-care. Schedule time for activities that make you feel good. It’s okay to prioritize alone time you need to recharge.


⭐️ Find support. Whether it’s with friends, family, a therapist, healer or a support group, talking about your feelings can help you feel better.

8 views0 comments